Fo’c’s’le Firkins – Shanties And Songs Of The Sea

Image courtesy of The Original Fo’c’s’le Firkins

This article also appeared in edition 151 of Trad And Now magazine in September 2022.

Here in south west Australia, and in niche but growing enclaves around the country and the world, many of us are starting to get a little excited for the upcoming Albany International Folk ‘n’ Shanty Festival which takes place from Friday 30 September to Sunday 2 October 2022.

“From fireside folk sessions and concerts, to full blown pub shanty singing, from tales of pirates, whales and shipwrecks; the Albany International Folk ‘n Shanty Festival turns historic Albany/Kinjarling into a playground of maritime culture.” – shantyfest.com

Albany may not lay claim to the most remote festival venue on the continent, but there would be few that could beat it. Albany is 3,335kms by road from Melbourne, 3,864kms from Sydney, and about a five hour drive south from Perth.

But more of the festival itself in a future edition. I mention it here for context to say I’ve been booked in to attend for a while, so when news of a CD launch of sea shanties and songs of the sea* bobbed up, my interest was already piqued.

* There’s a difference between the two. All shall be revealed hereunder.

The Original Fo’c’s’le Firkins launched their live CD in Fremantle at the Navy Club on Saturday 20 August 2022. It was a nice piece of musical recording symmetry as the album was recorded in 2021 at the same venue.

Band members were understandably taking any chance to plug the CD and gig around Fremantle in the lead-up, and group member Jon Cope spent some time during ‘Folking Around’ on Radio Fremantle to talk in detail about the recordings’ evolution and background.

Normally, I would have been one of the interviewers, however, I was struck down by a debilitating (non-plague) illness that week, so my colleagues of the airwaves manned the bridge and took the wheel: Frank Hodges (asking the lion’s share of the questions) and Alan Dawson (on the panel, knobs, buttons, and light comic relief).

Image courtesy of The Original Fo’c’s’le Firkins
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Crusty Crab (Jason from Stuart Park) Talks About Blues, Radio And Stuff – Rated PG

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Image courtesy of Crusty Crab

THE ATTACHED AUDIO FILE IS RATED PG FOR OCCASIONAL COARSE LANGUAGE AND THE RATHER DISTURBING WATERFALL SOUND EFFECT.

In a former life, on a radio station in a galaxy far, far away (Canberra), on-air interviews (live and pre-recorded) were my stock in trade.

I’d drag in musos, venue organisers, festival folk, artists, music media people, even garden variety punters.

I loved it.

In my current world and on my current radio station, it’s just not part of what I currently do. That may change in the future, but for now, I’m a simple disc-spinning jock bringing you music from the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90, noughties, twenty-tens, and today.

So this interview recorded at Top End Hash House Harriers on Thursday 19 March 2020 will never see it onto the airwaves for many reasons.

Certainly not if it stays unedited.

But it was fun to do, and if you can screen out that peaceful waterfall sound effect that we copped early in the piece, there’s actually some fair and valid points and opinions expressed.

I have this feeling it may not be the last one.

Anyhoo, Crusty, your request for David Gray’s Babylon is locked and loaded.

On Out!

Fishar$e

And as discussed towards the end, here’s Crusty’s doppelganger on the skins in this timeless clip from 1978.

From The Vault: The Woodford Files 2014-2015 – Miami Marketta and Rabbit Radio (Gold Coast), December 2014

rabbitradio
Image courtesy of Rabbit Radio

Originally posted in Timber and Steel: https://timberandsteel.wordpress.com/2014/12/30/the-woodford-files-miami-marketta-and-rabbit-radio-gold-coast/

I’m not certain, but it may be that Rabbit Radio has gone the way of the dodo. Their website comes back with an error message, and their last tweet was some time in 2016. Shame.

RabbitRadio
Image courtesy of Streema

Bill Quinn’s Overheard Productions title is about many things, but mostly about the chance slivers of conversation or even a word or two that leads to a new discovery.

Standing in The Duck at The Chef’s Table, waiting on a plate full of life-giving nachos, Bill chanced to hear and then see Joey Channon, the stage manager at The Duck for the morning and early afternoon sessions, and had his interest piqued by Joey’s t-shirt (Rabbit Radio).

Two days later, and Bill and Joey were seated in the most salubrious of surrounds (on the slippery slope at the back of the gent’s toilets next to The Duck and The Travelling Sisters‘ caravan), chatting about performance spaces, and radio, and grass roots music development.

*** Audio file will be removed by the end of March 2020 ***

*** Audio file will be removed by the end of March 2020 ***

MiamiMarketta
Image courtesy of Miami Marketta

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